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[05/11/2015] Keensight Capital supports Smile in its planned acquisition of Open Wide

Smile, the leading European expert in the integration of open source solutions, has announced that it has entered into exclusive negotiations for the acquisition of the company Open Wide.

[21/07/2015] Smile, 1st partner of Ansible in France

Ansible, based in North Carolina, USA, has developed an innovative and open source solution of IT automation. The solution Ansible is very powerful, enabling the management of complex configurations and industrializing deployments for a result "DevOps made simple".

[06/01/2014] Smile strengthens and changes its majority stakeholders

Keensight Capital, one of the leading players in European Growth Equity, is becoming the majority shareholder of Smile, the first expert in Europe for open source solutions, alongside its management and its historic investor, Edmond de Rothschild Investment Partners (with Cabestan Capital Fund), who also participated in this transaction.

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Guidelines to a BPM Project

BPM projects are more difficult than other IT projects and represent an additional risk because of their direct impact on the company's organization. Here are all the key points of a BPM project.

The aim of such a project is to implement an IT tool capable of motorizing the sequence of high valued tasks, which have been done by different actors within the firm. However, this vision is somewhat simplistic. Indeed, a BPM project is double-purposed: Automatize and Optimize, but both these objectives are independent from one another. In order to achieve them, we advise you to macroscopically organize your BPM projects the following way:

Design and process modeling

This part of the project is the biggest part of the job. It first of all consists in defining, along with the different actors, what the current company process is:

  • The activities
  • The interactions
  • The data source
  • The entering data
  • The outing data

During this phase, you must also anticipate the difficulties that you will encounter during the two following phases.

Modeling consists in :

  • Describing the reality of the existing process : meeting the actors of the process in order to describe the vision they have of their intervention in the process
  • Obtaining the agreement of all stakeholders: synthesize and make coherent all the visions of the different stakeholders

As long as you don't have this agreement, it will be difficult to provide them with a tool that does, differently but better, what they do.

Next comes the modeling process, in the modeling format of your choice (BPMN for instance), then the implementation in the tool of your choice (Bonita Open Source Solution or Intalio for instance).

Be careful not to fall into the classic trap of modeling: over-modeling. Indeed, when you first start your modeling work, it is frequent to reproduce in a fine way the totality of the events and situations you are likely to get into. It is better to be flexible in your process in order to be able to deal with “extraordinary” situations. Bare in mind that trying to model a rare situation is not very beneficial for your organization.

Execution of the process

Once your processes have been modeled, you can then use them in a production context. You will be able to confront them, in a way, with operational situations.

Monitoring

This phase is executed as soon as your processes have been implemented and used. It goes through a strong interaction with what is usable and through the application of process monitoring tools used in order to find the bottlenecks and weaknesses of your modeling.

This phase is essential. Once the process has been proofed, then comes the optimization. Through the implemented monitoring, we are able to measure and improve part of or entirely the way things are done. The improvement can go as follows: add new tasks, add new treatments, change the process's design etc.

Optimization

This phase is essential. Once the process has been proofed, then comes the optimization. Through the implemented monitoring, we are able to measure and improve part of or entirely the way things are done. The improvement can go as follows: add new tasks, add new treatments, change the process's design etc.

The optimization is the last phase of classic BPM cycle:

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Business_Process_Management_Life-Cycle.svg - Aleksander Blomskøld

A BPM project is highly iterative. The automation the project brings, gives the manager the necessary perspective to optimize processes and at the same time, allows him to back his teams when changes in organization or working methods occur.

Éric Drier de Laforte
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